Help Your Patients Quit Smoking

Health care providers who help patients quit smoking greatly increase the likelihood that your patients will achieve long-term success.1 2 More than two-thirds of smokers see a physician each year, and almost one-third see a dentist.3 Patient visits present an opportunity for interventions and cessation guidance.

If your patients want to quit, refer them to Florida’s free and evidence-based resources. Your patients can call the state quitline, use a web-based program, or attend in-person classes and they may receive free FDA-approved nicotine replacement therapy. Below are referral resources.

If you are a tobacco user trying to quit, please refer to the “Quitting Tobacco” tab at the top of this webpage, which will direct you to information about our free resources. To access the services directly, please call Tobacco Free Florida at 1-877-U-CAN-NOW (1-877-822-6669).

REFER YOUR PATIENTS

Refer Your Patients.

Quitting smoking is hard, but having professional support can make it easier. A number of referral resources exist in Florida to support you and your patients, including:

Help Patients
  • Ask them if you can refer them directly to Tobacco Free Florida to help. If they say yes, download and complete the fax referral form located here and below and fax it to: 1-866-688-7577. Once they are in the system, we can follow up with them—and you—and help them overcome their nicotine addiction as a team.
  • Or write down Tobacco Free Florida’s website, www.TobaccoFreeFlorida.com and phone number on a paper or prescription pad: 1-877-U-CAN-NOW (1-877-822-6669).
  • Provide them with a Quit Smoking Today brochure, which can be downloaded here. It has information about the program’s 3 Ways to Quit.
  • You can also provide them with a Quit Kit, which has quit tips, common smoking triggers and symptoms and ways to overcome them, as well information about Tobacco Free Florida’s free resources. Or direct them to tobaccofreeflorida.com/quitkit, where they can access, download and print the Quit Kit.
icon_form

Download the Provider Fax Referral Form for patients who are ready to quit within the next 30 days and fax it to
1-866-688-7577.

IN-OFFICE RESOURCES

In-office resources

Here are a few tools you can use to refer your patients to Tobacco Free Florida’s free services and help them quit tobacco for good.

If you are a tobacco user trying to quit, please refer to the “Quitting Tobacco” tab at the top of this webpage, which will direct you to information about our free resources. To access the services directly, please call Tobacco Free Florida at 1-877-U-CAN-NOW (1-877-822-6669).

  • Provider Fax Referral Form

    Download the Provider Fax Referral Form Form for patients who are ready to quit within the next 30 days and fax it to 1-866-688-7577.

    Quit Smoking Today Brochure

    Provide your patients with a brochure with quit tips and information about the Tobacco Free Florida’s free services.

    Benefits of Quitting Poster

    A poster for the waiting room or exam room that shows patients the short-term and long-term health benefits of quitting smoking. This poster can be printed as 8.5”x11”, or 11”x17”.

    Tobacco Free Florida Cessation Resources Poster

    A poster for the waiting room or exam room that provides patients information about Tobacco Free Florida’s free services.This poster can be printed as 8.5”x11”, or 11”x17”.

    Quit Kit

    Resources, tools and tips to help your patients quit and overcome nicotine withdrawal.

ABOUT NICOTINE REPLACEMENT THERAPY, PHARMACEUTICALS, AND OTHER QUIT AIDS

About Nicotine Replacement Therapy, Pharmaceuticals & Other Quit Aids

There are nicotine replacement therapies (NRT), pharmaceuticals, and other quit therapies that can help smokers deal with withdrawal symptoms and can lessen the urge to smoke. Using these products can double their chances of quitting. Tobacco Free Florida offers free NRT to Floridians, like nicotine patch and nicotine gum, when medically appropriate through its “3 Ways to Quit” services. Click here for more information about our free services.

If you prescribe a pharmaceutical solution, those patients can still tap into our support systems for additional help including cessation counseling.

You should only recommend products that have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), as these products have been proven safe and effective. Encourage patients to use them as directed on the product label. Using unapproved products could derail an attempt to quit smoking and prolong a smoker’s battle. Even worse, non FDA-approved products can carry serious health risks. NRT is only approved for sale to adults age 18 or older – younger patients may require other options.

Remind patients that NRT, pharmaceuticals and other quit aids are best used as part of a personalized quit plan. Tobacco Free Florida has free resources for patients. Click here to learn more.

NRTs work and can double a smoker’s chances of quitting alongside behavioral support from Tobacco Free Florida!

Chewing Gum
Skin Patches
Prescription-Only

Over-the-Counter (OTC) NRTs Include:

Skin Patches: Available as a generic product known as transdermal nicotine patches, as private-label products, and under brand names like Habitrol and Nicoderm. These patches are affixed to the skin, similar to how you would apply an adhesive bandage.

Chewing Gum: Available as a generic product known as nicotine gum, as private-label products, and under brand names like Nicorette.

Lozenges: Available as a generic product known as nicotine lozenges, as private-label products, and under brand names like Commit.

 

Prescription-Only NRTs Include:

A nasal spray and an oral inhaler are available under brand names like Nicotrol.

 

Non-Nicotine Quit Aids:

Prescription-only non-nicotine medications, like Chantix (varenicline tartrate) and Zyban (buproprion), are approved by the FDA to help patients quit smoking. They show very promising results for patients in their quit attempts by decreasing cravings and withdraw symptoms. Both carry serious risks, and patients should be made aware of these risks and monitored during use.

HELPING PATIENTS OVERCOME WITHDRAWAL

Helping Patients Overcome Withdrawal

Quitting smoking can be a long and emotional process for your patients. If one of your patients chooses to quit smoking, be sure to let them know of the possible withdrawal symptoms they may experience – like irritability, hunger and dizziness – and how to adequately and successfully deal with them.

While they may be aware of the health consequences of smoking and the damage their secondhand smoke can do to others, they may not be prepared for the physical and emotional changes of quitting. The struggle with nicotine addiction and “letting go” of smoking is due to the fact that smoking is also behavioral and closely linked to their daily activities. It may even serve as a coping mechanism or stress reliever to some.

The combination of physical and psychological strain that quitting smoking presents for patients is best met by providing guidance and encouragement to facilitate a successful quit attempt.

The Tobacco Free Florida Quit Kit provides useful resources you can review with and provide to your patients. Within the Quit Kit, patients will find information on triggers, quit tips, specific symptoms and coping methods – all of which can help prepare your patients for their quit journey. For more information, check out the Quit Kit.

Remember, many of the “symptoms” your patients will experience will also be good ones! Be sure to point out the immediate positive changes associated with quitting smoking.

TIPS FOR PATIENTS WHO ARE TRYING TO QUIT
References

1 Association of American Medical Colleges. Physician Behavior and Practice Patterns Related to Smoking Cessation. A Report Prepared for the American Legacy Foundation. 2007. http://www.legacyforhealth.org/PDFPublications/Physicians_Study.pdf

2 Curry, S.J., Fiore,M.C.,Orleans,C.T., & Keller, P.(2002).Addressing tobacco in managed care: Documenting the challenges and potential for systems-level change. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 4(Suppl 1), S5-7.

3 Fiore MC, Jaén CR, Baker TB, et al. Treating Tobacco Use and Dependence: 2008 Update. Clinical Practice Guideline. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service. May 2008.