Florida Clean Indoor Air Act

Protecting Florida’s residents from the deadly effects of secondhand smoke (SHS) is critical to keeping our communities healthy and vibrant. The Florida Clean Indoor Air Act (FCIAA) was enacted in 1985 by the Florida Legislature to protect people from the health hazards of SHS. In 2003, the Legislature passed an amendment to prohibit smoking in workplaces that previously allowed smoking. This was a major step toward preventing the serious health conditions and preventable deaths that can result from exposure to SHS.

Because of that amendment, Florida law prohibits smoking in most public and private businesses including restaurants. While there are few exceptions, such as stand-alone bars, retail tobacco shops and airport in-transit smoking lounges, the amendment makes it possible for people to read a book at a coffee shop, grab lunch with valued business partners or celebrate a family milestone without being exposed to the deadly mix of more than 7,000 chemicals in tobacco smoke, nearly 80 known to cause cancer. 1

Smoking is defined by the law as “possessing any lighted tobacco product, including cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, and any other lighted tobacco product.” According to this definition, the use of smokeless tobacco products and the use of e-cigarettes are exempted from the law.

Businesses do not always comply with the law and this can lead to severe health consequences, particularly for children, people with existing health conditions, and the elderly who are more vulnerable to the effects of SHS exposure. By reporting a violation of the law, you can play an important role in ensuring that your loved ones and neighbors are better protected from toxic SHS.

For more information download the FCIAA brochure.

Help Protect Florida’s Families From Secondhand Smoke

If you see unlawful smoking, report the violation to the Bureau of Tobacco Free Florida.

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Get Smart

  • The Florida Clean Indoor Air Act (FCIAA) protects people from secondhand smoke (SHS).
    • In November 2002, 71% of Florida’s voters approved a state constitutional amendment to prohibit smoking in enclosed indoor workplaces. The law became effective July 1, 2003.
    • “Enclosed indoor workplace” means any place where one or more persons engage in work, and that is predominantly or totally bounded on all sides and above by physical barriers.
    • The FCIAA includes specific exceptions where smoking may be allowed indoors, including a private residence when not being used commercially, stand-alone bars, retail tobacco shops, smoking guest rooms in hotels and motels, smoking cessation programs and airport in-transit smoking lounges on the international side of airports.
  • Floridians are still regularly exposed to SHS, a dangerous mix of 7,000 chemicals and compounds, hundreds that are toxic and at least 80 known to cause cancer. 2
    • There is indisputable evidence that implementing 100 percent smoke-free environments is the only effective way to protect the population from the harmful effects of exposure to SHS. 3
    • There is no risk-free level of exposure to SHS; breathing even a little SHS can be dangerous. 4
    • Creating separate non-smoking areas in establishments that allow smoking, cleaning the air, and ventilating buildings do not eliminate SHS. 5
  • Exposure to SHS can cause serious illnesses and even death.
    • Since 1964, 2.5 million nonsmokers in the U.S. have died because of SHS exposure. 6
    • Secondhand smoke exposure is causally linked to heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, lower respiratory illness, and impaired lung function. 7
    • Each year, among U.S. nonsmokers, exposure to SHS causes an estimated 33,000 premature deaths from heart disease 8 and about 3,400 premature deaths from lung cancer. 9 10
    • Nonsmokers exposed to SHS at home or at work increase their risk of developing heart disease by 25 to 30 percent and their risk of developing lung cancer by 20 to 30 percent. 11
    • Inhaling SHS could be enough to block arteries and trigger a heart attack in someone whose arteries are silently clogged. 12
  • Exposure to SHS is very dangerous for children.
    • Breathing SHS increases a child’s risk of lung problems, ear infections, and severe asthma.
    • Infants exposed to SHS are at a greater risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). 13 SIDS is the sudden, unexplained, unexpected death of an infant in the first year of life. SIDS is the leading cause of death in otherwise healthy infants. 14
    • SHS can trigger an asthma attack. A severe asthma attack can put a child’s life in danger. 15
    • In the first two years of life, children exposed to SHS have more than a 50 percent increased risk of getting bronchitis and pneumonia. 16
References

1U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010.

2U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010.

3World Health Organization. “Protection From Exposure To Secondhand Tobacco Smoke Policy recommendations.” 2007.

4U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006

5U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006.

6National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Printed with corrections, January 2014.

7U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Printed with corrections, January 2014.

8U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. Printed with corrections, January 2014.

9Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Years of Potential Life Lost, and Productivity Losses—United States, 2000–2004. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report 2008;57(45):1226–8 [accessed 2013 June 10].

10American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts and Figures 2013. Atlanta: American Cancer Society, 2013 [accessed 2013 Feb 10].

11U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Coordinating Center for Health Promotion, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006

12U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease

13Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010

14Anderson, H.R. and D.G. Cook. 1997. Health Effects of Passive Smoking-2: Passive Smoking and Sudden Infant

15American Academy of Pediatrics, Task Force on Sudden Infant Death Syndrome. The Changing Concept of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: Diagnostic Coding Shifts; Controversies Regarding the Sleeping Environment; and New Variables to Consider in Reducing Risk. Pediatrics 2005;116(5):1245–55 [cited 2013 June 10].

16U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. ―The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General.? U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2006